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Mummers Parade live stream from Philadelphia on New Year's Day


Mummers Parade live

31.12.2018 10:18:25 - Watch live streaming of the Philadelphia Mummers parade on new years day. Philly Mummers live stream.

(live-PR.com) - The Mummers parade in Philadelphia returns once again for new year's day 2019, filling the city streets with music and entertainment to welcome the new year in style.

You can watch the Mummers parade live stream online here:

www.myworldevents.com/parade/mummers-philadelphi ..

Mummers Parade lineup

This years parade lineup is as follows:

String Bands

Greater Kensington
Durning
Pennsport
Broomall
Greater Overbrook
Aqua
Hegeman
Uptown
Avalon
Duffy
Polish American
South Philadelphia
Fralinger
Ferko
Woodland
Quaker City

Fancy Brigades

Shooting Stars
Second Street

 

Shooters
Purple Magic
Clevemore
Golden Crown
Avenuers
Downtowners
Jokers
Saturnalian
Satin Slipper
Vikings
Spartans

Wench Brigades

American
Cara Liom
Oregon
Bryson
O'Malley
Riverfront
Pirates
Jhj Saints
Froggy Carr

Comics

Goodtimers
Landi
Murray

Mummers Parade history

The Mummers Parade is held each New Year's Day in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. It is believed to be the oldest folk festival in the United States.

Local clubs (usually called "New Years Associations") compete in one of four categories (comics, fancies, string bands, and fancy brigades). They prepare elaborate costumes, performance routines, and moveable scenery, which take months to complete. This is done in clubhouses – many of which are on or near 2nd Street (called "Two Street" by some local residents) in the Pennsport neighborhood of the city's South Philadelphia section – which also serve as social gathering places for members.

The parade has been broadcast since 1993 on WPHL-TV, which has live streamed the event on its website since 2011. After a national campaign to get the parade nationally televised, an edited two-hour broadcast of the parade was picked up by WGN America and WGN-TV; the broadcast debuted January 3, 2009.

The parade traces back to mid-17th-century roots, blending elements from Swedish, Finnish, Irish, English, German, and other European heritages, as well as African heritage. The parade is related to the Mummers Play tradition from Britain and Ireland. Revivals of this tradition are still celebrated annually in South Gloucestershire, England on Boxing Day along with other locations in England and in parts of Ireland on St. Stephen's Day and also in the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador around Christmas.

Swedes and Finns, the first European colonists in the Philadelphia area, brought the custom of visiting neighbors on "Second Day Christmas" (December 26) with them to Tinicum. This was soon extended through New Year's Day with costumed celebrants loudly parading through the city. They appointed a "speech director", who performed a special dance with a traditional rhyme.

The parade traveled northward on Broad Street in Philadelphia for decades until the 1995 parade when the parade was moved to Market Street due to construction work on Broad Street (notably the "Avenue of the Arts" between Washington Avenue and Philadelphia City Hall). After construction was completed, the parade returned to Broad Street from 1996 to 1999. For various reasons, the parade was moved again to Market Street in 2000. In 2004, the parade was moved back to Broad Street. In 1997, the Fancy Brigades were moved to the Pennsylvania Convention Center, allowing for larger sets, but limiting audience size. In 2011, the Fancy Brigades returned to the parade.

Each year, thousands of people participate in the parade, many wearing elaborate costumes costing tens of thousands of dollars to make and weighing well over 100 pounds. $395,000 in prizes is awarded to the various winners. The costs for making the outfits plus fees to choreographers and prop designers often far exceed the prizes available. While club fund-raisers, hall rentals and bank loans often cover much of the expense, individual members frequently spend hundreds or thousands of dollars of their own money. To raise funds, many string bands and their members seek paying gigs, particularly in area Fourth of July parades, the annual "Show of Shows" (held in Atlantic City, New Jersey, each winter), weddings and other events. Many clubs hold "beef and beers" or 50/50 raffles. Most charge annual dues for membership.


Author:
Martin Kerrigan
e-mail
Web: http://www.myworldevents.com
Phone: 0035799813173


 

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